In the last week, all Twitter users were given the Twitter List functionality. What are they? On the surface lists look like an extension of what Twitter already does, essentially giving the user more timelines. In reality, the simple add on has a lot of uses, including:

  • The ability to de-clutter and organize those you’re following
  • The ability to get updates without having to follow someone in your main stream
  • A great way to see what others are doing and find new people

In a sense, this move has made Twitter more useful and immediate. It gives the user the ability to switch views from the immediate and constant to custom streams that can be viewed occasionally. Twitter was a great tool at the recent Planningness event (check out the twitter search results to see how it unfolded). A tool like lists would let you isolate all those people and view it in a stream without also hearing from your other friends, news sources, and misc. tweeple you might follow.

The New York Times jumped on the bandwagon early and developed all kinds of lists from a complete list of their tweeting staff (@nytimes/staff) to specialized lists on technology (@nytimes/nyt-technology-bits-blog) and the World Series (@nytimes/nyt-world-series-2009). I’ve seen plenty of other lists out there as well.

W5 hasn’t created any lists yet. While we will, I think it would be more interesting to see what our followers might want to see from us. Any ideas for the types of lists you’d like to see?  Leave them in the comments or send me at e-mail mmolloy@w5insight.com if you’re shy.

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